Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Please contact us if you have a question not listed here.

  1.  What license do I need for my business?
  2.  How do I find a seminar for required training?
  3.  How do I take an online training for my certification?
  4.  Where is the Division of Liquor Control located?
  5.  What are the Liquor Laws in Vermont?
  6.  Where do I find compliance check data?
  7.  Who is my assigned DLC  investigator?
  8.  Where do I make a complaint?
  9.  Who has a suspended license?
  10.  Do I need a solicitor’s license?
  11.  What can I do with my solicitor license?
  12.  Does an employee of a promotional agency require a solicitor's license?  These agencies provide industry support to conduct tastings, events, etc.
  13.  If an industry person appears at a Vermont Department of Liquor and Lottery spirits listing presentation or to meet with in the offices of the Director of Purchasing or Commissioner, etc., are they required to be licensed?
  14.  If an out of state industry member works the Vermont marketplace for one day and is in the company of a licensed solicitor, are they required to be licensed?
  15.  If I currently hold a solicitor’s license for beer and wine, will I be required to get an additional license to solicit sales of distilled spirits?
  16.  I am having a wedding/party. Do I need a license?
  17.  When do I need to hire a caterer?
  18.  Can I get a mobile liquor license?
  19.  Can I get a one-day liquor license?
  20.  Can I buy the alcohol that my hired caterer will serve?
  21.  Can I just hire a “Licensed Bartender”?
  22.  I represent a non-profit entity; do I need a liquor license?
  23.  How do I handle cigarette and other tobacco products tax collection?
  24.  Can I sell vape, e-cigarette, or other tobacco products without a license?
  25.  Can I get a one-day or short-term tobacco license?
  26.  Where can I buy vape, e-cigarette, or other tobacco products for sale in my licensed establishment?
  27.  What do I need to produce and/or sell bitters/tinctures?

 


  1. Do I need a solicitor’s license?
    1. If you are employed by any manufacturer, distributor, or broker located in Vermont or any other state or jurisdiction, and you, by canvassing or interviewing holders of licenses, solicit orders for and promote the sale of alcoholic beverages, you are required to hold a solicitors license issued by the Division of Liquor Control before engaging in that activity.
  2. What can I do with my solicitor license?
    1. You can travel to and interview holders of licenses with the intent to solicit orders for and promote the sale of alcoholic beverages.
  3. Does an employee of a promotional agency require a solicitor's license?  These agencies provide industry support to conduct tastings, events, etc.
    1. No license would be required. The licensing requirement applies to solicitors (manufacturer sales reps.) that represent manufacturers and sell into on or off- premise retail accounts. The promotional agency employee referenced here would be technically pouring samples to the general public and would be excluded from the requirement.
  4. If an industry person appears at a Vermont Department of Liquor and Lottery spirits listing presentation or to meet with in the offices of the Director of Purchasing or Commissioner, etc., are they required to be licensed?
    1. No license would be required.  In this example the supplier, or their representative, would be soliciting business from a wholesaler (Vermont Department of Liquor and Lottery) and not a licensed retailer.  As a result, this activity would be exempt from the solicitor license requirement.
  5. If an out of state industry member works the Vermont marketplace for one day and is in the company of a licensed solicitor, are they required to be licensed or would the licensed solicitors permit act as an umbrella license for the visiting industry member?
    1. No license would be required.  In this example the license holding solicitor would be held responsible for the behavior and outcomes of the sales manager.
  6. If I currently hold a solicitor’s license for beer and wine, will I be required to get an additional license to solicit sales of distilled spirits?
    1. If a sales representative is currently licensed to solicit orders for beer or wine, their ability to solicit spirit sales would be included into the existing license. When that license is renewed it will include solicitation activities for all three versions of beverage alcohol.
  7. I am having a wedding/party. Do I need a license?
    1. Title 7 VSA § 61 states that the furnishing of alcoholic beverages by an individual in his or her private dwelling unless the dwelling becomes a place of public resort does not require a license issued by the Department of Liquor and Lottery. A dwelling is defined by Vermont law Title 12 V.S.A. § 4931 and Title 9 V.S.A. § 4451.
  8. When do I need to hire a caterer?
    1. Title 7 VSA § 61 states that the furnishing of alcoholic beverages by an individual in his or her private dwelling unless the dwelling becomes a place of public resort does not require a license issued by the Department of Liquor and Lottery. If you intend for the service of alcoholic beverages to occur anywhere other than your private dwelling, or on a licensed premise, you will need to hire a licensed caterer. You can find a list of licensed caterers under Public Information -> Licensing Lists and Reports -> Licensed Caters.
  9. Can I get a mobile liquor license?
    1. The Department of Liquor and Lottery only issues 1st and 3rd class licenses to physical permanent structures across the state and does not issue a license to a truck, van, trailer, or any other automobiles etc. However, a caterer's license, issued to a physical permanent structure, does allow for that caterer to then submit catering requests to the local control (municipal) commissioners in towns and cities across the state in order to offer alcoholic beverage service in locations other than licensed establishments. That catering service could be from a truck, van, trailer, or any other automobile.
  10. Can I get a one-day liquor license?
    1. 1st and 3rd class licenses are issued licenses to physical permanent structures across the state for a full licensing year. Vermont Law 7 V.S.A. § 253  allows for a Festival permit to be granted by the Division of Liquor Control.  This allows a person to conduct an event at which malt or vinous beverages, or both, are sold by the glass to the public, provided the event is approved by the local control (municipal) commissioners, and is limited to no more than 4 days in duration.
    2. Application for a Festival Permit can be found under Licensing -> Application Forms -> Miscellaneous Forms and Permits -> Festival Permit.
  11. Can I buy the alcohol that my hired caterer will serve?
    1. No. General Regulations imposed by the Board of Liquor and Lottery require that licensed caterers purchase on invoice the alcoholic beverage they serve from either licensed wholesalers in the state, or from Vermont Liquor Stores.
  12. Can I just hire a “Licensed Bartender”?
    1. No. The Vermont Division of Liquor Control does not license bartenders. Staff who are employed by licensed establishments are required to be certified in the sale and/or service of alcoholic beverages, but that certification does not allow them to sell or serve anywhere other than on a licensed premise. You can hire a licensed caterer to provide the service of alcoholic beverages at your event. You can find a list of licensed caterers under Public Information -> Licensing Lists and Reports -> Licensed Caters.
  13. I represent a non-profit entity; do I need a liquor license?
    1. Yes. Title 7 VSA § 661 establishes a criminal penalty for anyone that sells, furnishes, or keeps with the intent to sell alcoholic beverages without first obtaining a license from the Division of Liquor Control. Non-profit organizations that are interested in selling or serving alcoholic beverages should pursue the correct form of license or permit before doing so. See related questions on this FAQ page or contact the Division of Liquor Control for assistance in determining which license or permit is required.
  14. How do I handle cigarette and other tobacco products tax collection?
    1. Please review Notice of Changes to Vermont's Tobacco Laws for joint guidance from the Attorney General's Office, and the Department of Tax for more information.
  15. Can I sell vape, e-cigarette, or other tobacco products without a license?
    1. Title 7 VSA § 1002 states that no person shall engage in the retail sale of tobacco products, tobacco substitutes, or tobacco paraphernalia in his or her place of business without a tobacco license obtained from the Division of Liquor Control. Vape devices and accessories including products like electronic cigarettes or other electronic or battery-powered devices, that contain and are designed to deliver nicotine or other substances into the body through the inhalation of vapor and that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for tobacco cessation or other medical purposes are consider a tobacco substitute and therefore require a tobacco license for sale to the public.
  16. Can I get a one-day or short-term tobacco license?
    1. Yes. Examples such as fairs, bazaars, festivals and farmer’s markets are eligible for a tobacco license providing they meet licensing criteria. You can find the application for a tobacco license under Licensing -> Application Forms -> Miscellaneous Forms and Permits -> Tobacco Only License.
  17. Where can I buy vape, e-cigarette, or other tobacco products for sale in my licensed establishment?
    1. Effective July 1st 2019, Title 7 VSA § 1002 requires that holders of a tobacco license issued by the Division of Liquor Control only offer for sale tobacco products, tobacco substitutes, substances containing nicotine or otherwise intended for use with a tobacco substitute, or tobacco paraphernalia that was purchased on invoice from a licensed wholesale dealer in Vermont.  The Vermont Department of Taxes maintains a list of the Licensed Dealers of Cigarette and Tobacco Products.

    2. Specific definitions of tobacco paraphernalia and other tobacco products can be found in Title 7 V.S.A. § 1001, but include: any device used, intended for use, or designed for use in smoking, inhaling, ingesting, or otherwise introducing tobacco products into the human body, or for preparing tobacco for smoking, inhaling, ingesting, or otherwise introducing into the human body, including devices for holding tobacco, rolling paper, wraps, cigarette rolling machines, pipes, water pipes, carburetion devices, bongs, and hookahs as well as products, including electronic cigarettes or other electronic or battery-powered devices, that contain and are designed to deliver nicotine or other substances into the body through the inhalation of vapor and that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for tobacco cessation or other medical purposes.

  18.  What do I need to produce and/or sell bitters/tinctures?

    1. The Department of Liquor and Lottery, Divison of Liquor Control only regulates "Beverage Alcohol." In the case of Bitters and/or Tinctures, DLC does not have the capacity nor the ability to determine for you if your product is or is not beverage alcohol.

      In the case of Bitters and/or Tinctures, we encourage you to contact the TTB and determine whether or not your product requires formula approval as ”Beverage Alcohol,” or designation as “Non-Beverage Products Unfit for Beverage Purposes” from the Tax and Trade Bureau.

      Please use this link and further contact the TTB for more information:
      https://www.ttb.gov/scientific-services-division/dbmenu3sub1

How to Reach Us

Patrick T. Delaney, Commissioner
13 Green Mountain Drive
Montpelier VT 05602
802-828-2345

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Gary Kessler, Deputy Commissioner

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